Friday, January 8, 2016

DRIP POTS

     When I saw a drip-pot project on Pinterest I knew I wanted to try it as a way to spruce up my clay pots. I then tried it on the plastic pots and it work just as well. I use acrylic/fabric paint. It is inexpensive, about a dollar for a 2 oz bottle. You can use any combination of colors you want. I found thinning it a little helps make for better coverage if you want the colors to smear and blend, or you can leave it chunky for a more textured look. A blow dryer can be used to help smear, blend, or add directional lines. (Be careful of where you do this activity; it will splash.)
     For my living room I always wanted a planter divider on the stairway shelf, but nothing too permanent. This quick fix seemed the perfect solution.  It also provides a place for me to grow some herbs. (Quick note: should you decide to bring in any soil from outside, make sure it wasn't composted--unless you want a kitchen full of fruit flys! I compost on my porch and in my herb pots. It was a sorry mistake to think I could just bring in the pots during the winter without infesting my house! Live and learn as they say!)
     For safety, I nailed a trim board along the back-edge of the stairway and butted the pots against this backboard. This project entailed the following supplies:



  • 4--8"X 6"X24" plastic planters
  • acrylic paint (dripped right from the bottle or apply with brushed)
  • pumice rock (layer the bottom of the pot for drainage
  • soil (sterilize) 
  • play sand (optional for the top lay to keep down bug infestations)


Wednesday, November 11, 2015

Change

     Walking through the store the other day, with a quick glance, I happened to point out some interesting paint colors to my daughter. Her eyes lite up and I knew immediately what I had done. She had been toying with the idea of moving her daughter from her crib to a bigger bed and with only a little encouragement the "plan" started to form.

     Change is most always bitter-sweet. Overnight my granddaughter went from her baby crib to a "big-girl" bed. I believe that transition is difficult for any parent, but the change was so dramatic it was hard to look back with any lingering thoughts. The first night my granddaughter slept in her "new" room was a wonder to behold. Her eyes were extra-large as she snuggled under her new cover. The first time I've ever seen her sleep with anything but her blankie touching her!

     The next morning, still in awe, she exclaimed several times throughout the day, "I like my room."

     One of the changes that really helped bring the room together was painting the old dresser. As a wood worker, covering wood with paint is almost sacrilegious--it just isn't done! And the fact that is was my grandmothers, and mother's dresser made it even more of a sacred object. But the dingy, yellowing wood had stood as an eyesore in my granddaughter's room long enough. In communing with Grandma Kate and Mom, I had to ask them if this was okay....change is hard for me. Both of them were artist and I could not hear their objections. With a final plea to my daughter, "Are you sure you want this painted," it met with a resounding, "Yes!"

     The dresser was sanded to smooth out some of the rough wear and to clean the wood. We used the same paint we used on the wall, applying the dark pink on the outer frame, while the drawers were painted the lighter pink. My daughter carefully taped each square, then used a roller over stencil. She was careful to apply only one or two rolls, then cleaned the stencil between each use. It was a little time consuming, but the results were clearly worth the effort. The painted dresser really worked to bring the room together and I think Grandma Kate is smiling down on her great-great granddaughter snuggled in her pink--very pink--room!




Saturday, March 21, 2015

WELCOME!

Welcome!  I wanted to create a site that would allow people to explore my craft in a more personal way, yet provide quick access to information for those interested in exploring the range and dependability of my products. I've provided slide shows to reflect the host of mediums I work with and some of my past design. A few of these designs are rather complicated--making them unique and hard to duplicate--but I would be happy to try and reproduce something similar for those interested in what they see in my shop, blog, or Facebook postings.

I have been a life long crafter. My mother, a child of the depression, was extremely thrifty in everything she cooked or created. She was amazing at making so little do so much. She could feed a family of five (plus whoever else showed up) on one chicken, and she would have leftovers! Her biscuits were a meal in themselves, and her salads seemed to possess some secret ingredient that made them so tasty. My cutest school dresses were made from scraps of leftover material. My prom dress was made from bargin material and cost her...and I'm not making this up....25 cents! While my peers were spending hundreds of dollars on wedding dress, she made mine for $30. My mother was welcoming, thrifty, creative, hardworking, all things I still aspire too, and in some way continue her story in the designs I create. For me, creating is more than just a hobby or business, it is an expression of life and nature itself.

I am always hesitant to call my craft "art." It seems to me an arrogant boosting since I have not really studied art, per se, but I feel I have devoted years to stratagems and tricks needed to perfect my craft. Some of those ideas I am willing to share on my "Crafting Projects" page, but as long as I am doing this I realize there is always more to learn. I'm proud to boast that I am a life-long learner and enjoy the thrill of taking on new challenges! Look around, leave a comment, or contact me is you have any questions, suggestions or requests.
     ~~~~~~Happy crafting!
My mom collecting crafting material for home decorations.